Workplace Music and Telephone on Hold Music

Workplace Music and Telephone on Hold Music

This OneMusic licence scheme is designed for businesses who:

  • provide – or allow – music at employee workstations or on the worksite, at selected company events, in reception areas, in the back dock, lunchrooms and on the factory floor; and/or
  • have music on their external telephone system, when a caller first dials in, when the receptionist transfers the call or even on after-hours messages. Telephone on hold music likely complements other music in your shop, business, practice, medical waiting room, bar, club, beauty treatment room or restaurant.

Most businesses use music from OneMusic in one of the ways described above and will require this licence from OneMusic. In some cases some of these uses may already be covered under other of our licence schemes (e.g. the Hotel licence scheme), but that cover does not extend to head and branch offices, who will need this licence. See other licence types to check if you need an additional licence.

If you have 6 or more locations, please complete this form instead:

Why do I need a OneMusic licence?

Firstly, it shows that your organisation respects and supports songwriters and recording artists - creators of Australian culture. Secondly, if you use copyright music within your business, Commonwealth legislation requires permission (a licence) from the creators of that music. And last but not least - you benefit by using music: keeping your patrons entertained, engaged and creating a better atmosphere.

In Australia music creators generally authorise two organisations to administer their rights - APRA AMCOS (composers and music publishers) and PPCA (recording artists and record labels). A OneMusic licence bundles all those rights into one licence that further simplifies the process of gaining the required permission to use music. Without this licence you would, for example, need to deal directly with the composers, songwriters, music publishers, recording artists and record labels who own the rights in the music you wish to use.

You can get independent legal information at copyright.org.au.

Where does the money go?

We care about ensuring the licence fees you pay are distributed (paid out) to the rights holders in the most accurate and cost effective way possible.

OneMusic distributes the fees it collects to APRA AMCOS and PPCA, the bodies behind the licensing initiative. Both entities are the same in that, after the deduction of administration and operational costs, all fees collected are distributed to members, licensors or affiliates according to a range of direct data for film screenings, sample data and other data sources for other uses of music. All fees quoted include GST.

Although separate companies, in the financial year 2017/2018 APRA AMCOS’ and PPCA’s costs to revenue ratio was similar at approximately 14%. This means that around 86 cents in the dollar earned in licence fees collected by APRA AMCOS and PPCA is being paid to each organisation’s rights holders. Those costs compare very favourably to organisations providing the same service overseas. 

Under OneMusic, APRA AMCOS and PPCA maintain their own distribution practices and policies, and are available online. 

Both APRA AMCOS and PPCA seek to achieve a delicate balance in their distribution practices - a balance between accuracy on the one hand and minimising the administration of our licensees and our costs of processing that would be required in track by track music use reports.

The following represent the main sources of music data the two organisations use to make their distributions to music creators.

  • Individual commercial radio and television stations reporting the music they broadcast;
  • Digital download services, digital streaming services and record labels reporting the tracks or CDs they stream, sell and their sales volumes;
  • Services using Music Recognition Technology like digital fingerprinting and audio-recognition to match performances/broadcasts to their databases;
  • Data from music providers who supply programmed curated music for specific industries, such as fitness;
  • Background music suppliers who provide us with music reports from their clients’ playlists; and
  • Set lists of musical works performed by artists and musicians at live/dance events and festivals supplied to APRA by event promoters.

How are licence fees set and how much do they cost?

The rates for the use of music under OneMusic licence schemes have been set following consultation and negotiation with user groups. We have established different licence schemes for different ways those industries use music.

Rates have been determined in general by reference to the nature and type of music use. That is, in our view the value of music to a nightclub (a business that attracts customers predominantly on the basis of the music it plays) is very different to the value of music to a café. Our fees are therefore segmented to different industry types in order to appropriately differentiate rates.

In addition, the rate needs to be scalable – for example we do not believe that all other things being equal, a small retail outlet should pay the same fee as a large department store, or a small country pub the same as a large city hotel. From this starting point, in very broad terms where the music use is intrinsic to the business, our rates tend to be higher and linked to patronage (for example by reference to attendance, capacity, class numbers or box office takings). At the other end of the spectrum, rates will be linked to another metric that is easily ‘measured’ by the business and verifiable by us – for example the size of the business in metres squared.

We publish a series of information sheets to all of our industry specific licence schemes on this website.

What music can I use?

We’ve done the hard work for you so our licence allows you to use virtually any commercially released music from anywhere around the world.

Business owners can make a decision to use our music or not. We accept that there is a small percentage of businesses who do not wish to have our music playing because they claim it costs too much and of course, no licence is required in these cases.

As a safeguard, we believe it is wise to advise us immediately if you use music in your business in any way so we can advise if you need a licence from OneMusic. This applies to all areas of your business – office, warehouse, front reception area, retail space, yards and outdoor areas.

Why do I need a licence when I have a streaming service?

You need a licence from OneMusic because your commercial/business use is not covered by your digital music service supplier.

Have a look at the terms and conditions of your personal digital music service end-user agreement. You will see that almost all digital music services operating in Australia and New Zealand strictly state their service is for PERSONAL and DOMESTIC use only.

Because personal digital music services are licensed by rights holders for just that purpose – PERSONAL and DOMESTIC use – and therefore do not cover your use of music in your business, if you have chosen to use a personal digital music service you will require the appropriate coverage from OneMusic so that you do not infringe our copyright – for example the relevant background music package and digital copy/delivery if you are a hotel, or a Gold package (which provides you with the necessary cover under a single fee) if you are a retailer or dining establishment.

The use of such personal digital music services itself by your business may still be in breach of the terms and conditions of your end user agreement with that service. Because these permissions are actually not controlled by OneMusic all we can do is suggest you contact your personal digital music service provider to discuss with them how you are using their service in your business.

See Myths about Streaming: www.musicbusinessworldwide.com/3-myths-music-streaming-3-truths-music-industry-today/

How do I amend my account?

For amendments such as changes to music use, change of ownership or change of legal entity contact us at hello@onemusic.com.au or phone 1300 162 162.

If your business has been affected by a disaster such as fire, flood, storm or drought, or if wish to request extended payment terms due to hardship, please contact our Customer Support team on 1300 162 162 or email hello@onemusic.com.au to discuss options and put your account on hold, pending an update of the situation.

Can I set up a payment plan?

Yes you can.

OneMusic provides quarterly invoices for accounts where licence fees are in excess of $500 per year, however if this is not suitable and you are experiencing financial difficulties, all you need to do is email hello@onemusic.com.au and request a payment extension or payment plan. Your account will be reviewed by our Credit Team, and based on the balance owing and the time frame involved we will get back to you with some options to help you through any difficulties.

How do I cancel my account?

If you have ceased trading, if you no longer wish to use OneMusic’s musical works, sound recordings or music videos in your business, or have entered into alternative licence arrangements for some of the rights represented by OneMusic, please complete our Licence Cancellation Request form.

How do I contact OneMusic?

If you wish to speak with our friendly team, contact us at hello@onemusic.com.au, via live chat or call us on 1300 162 162

Do I have to go through OneMusic to play music in my business?

The OneMusic licence provides the easiest and most cost effective way to access the world’s repertoire of music. There are other options, which may include direct licensing arrangements with copyright owners or solely using music outside the OneMusic repertoire.

If you make a direct arrangement for only your sound recording use or only your musical work use, contact OneMusic Australia so we can adjust your licence fee, as applicable.

I only have a home office, why do I need a OneMusic licence?

Home offices are provided with a complimentary licence under OneMusic as long as they can satisfy all following conditions:

  • the business employs fewer than 20 people;
  • and the music is not intended to be heard by customers of the business or by the general public. That is, it must be manifestly unintentional that customers or the general public can inadvertently hear the playing of music by a business from a device in the Home Office, such as a radio or a television set. 

As a result of the findings from the 1998 inquiry into copyright, music and small business by the House of Representatives Standing Committees’ on Legal and Constitutional Affairs, APRA AMCOS implemented a policy which grants Complimentary Licences to small business who fulfil all of the above specific conditions.