5 questions to ask yourself before making a playlist for your venue

Music has the extraordinary power of creating an atmosphere and transporting us to a different place.

Music has the extraordinary power of creating an atmosphere and transporting us to a different place.

However, knowing what to play, in what order or at what time of the day can be tough.

Here’s 5 questions to help you craft the perfect playlist for your venue. These are inspired by sound agency Gray V’s advice, who have curated playlists for some of the biggest venues in the world.

  1. What is the space like? Are there low ceilings?Does the space indicate if a specific genre will suit better in terms of volume? Looking at the space can be a good starting point.
  2. What is the spirit of your brand? How does design and aesthetic inform the direction of the music? Is your furniture different in any way? Do you want to attract a specific age group? Selecting one element that defines your venue will help with your music choices. 
  3. What time of the day is the music for? Some venues look very different at lunch than at dinner time. We recommend doing a few playlists. One chilled for the morning, another more energetic and an upbeat/dance one for nigh time. No repeats! 
  4. How is the lighting? Is the mood of the room dark and intimate or bright and electric? Music should be consistent and accompany the rest of elements.
  5. How do you want people to feel? Thinking about the end result will help you select the right music. If you want your customers to feel relaxed, in no rush, downtempo music, jazz or blues can set that scene. If you want people to get up and dance, you will need to tap into upbeat music, try funk, pop or disco.

“When someone comes into a restaurant, they’re coming to catch up with friends, conduct business, or take their family, or maybe a first date. The last thing people want to hear is a crazy guitar solo or a breakdown in the middle of a song” says YiPeiVP of Licensing & Label Relations at Gray V in NY.

A venue is becoming more about the overall experience rather than the food or drinks you serve. It’s about the vibe customer’s associate with the place and what they remember when they leave.

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